Appearance

Bobcats are found in all 48 of the continental United States. They are the smallest of the North American wildcats, although they are similar in size to a lynx (much smaller than a mountain lion).

Bobcats generally have spots, and although they have ear tufts like a lynx, the tufts are generally quite a bit smaller.

Bobcats in this ecosystem

There are bobcats all around the greater Yellowstone ecosystem, but you’re unlikely to see one in the wild.

Bobcats are generally solitary animals, keeping their own territories, which can be as big as 40 square miles in some parts of the country. Unlike most cats, the males are more tolerant about overlapping territories than the females, who prefer a strictly solitary life.

DIET

Bobcats are carnivores, eating rabbits, rodents, birds, and even small deer and adult pronghorns.

At the Sanctuary, chicken is our bobcat’s primary food, supplemented with rats, mice, and big bones to chew on.

Bobcats are most active around twilight, although their schedule shifts in cold winter weather, when they’re more active during the day.

BEHAVIOR & Lifespan

Bobcats typically live for about 7 years, and rarely over 10.

Our Bobcat

Taxonomy

KINGDOM: Animalia
PHYLUM: Chordata
CLASS: Mammalia
ORDER: Carnivora
FAMILY: Felidae
GENUS: Lynx
SPECIES: rufus

conservation status

IUCN Status LC.png

Least Concern

MOST ACTIVE

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Crepuscular

  BOB  was raised as a pet, and came here when he was no longer able to be taken care of by his original owners. He is declawed and habituated to humans, so he can never be released into the wild. Bob was born in 2011.

BOB was raised as a pet, and came here when he was no longer able to be taken care of by his original owners. He is declawed and habituated to humans, so he can never be released into the wild. Bob was born in 2011.

 

Bobcat-Related Episodes of our Podcast