Can you help us?

We need your help saving some beautiful mountain lion cubs!

About a month ago, a mountain lion was hit by a car and killed in Wyoming. Her three cubs were about five months old, and would have spent another year and a half with her learning how to hunt and live on their own. The cubs came in close to town, and the male succeeded in killing a deer on someone’s lawn.

At that point, Wyoming Game & Fish had to step in. Rather than euthanizing the cubs — standard procedure across the country in most cases like this — they chose to look for a way to keep the babies alive. They called us.

We don’t have room for three more mountain lions here at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary. They may be cubs now, but they’ll be full-grown soon enough and they’ll need a lot of space. We found a facility that does have room — a fantastic sanctuary called Shambala in California — and they agreed to take all three if we couldn’t get them released into the wild. At that point, we enlarged and outfitted our quarantine area and told Wyoming Game & Fish we could take the cats.

Starting the rebuild of the 300 square foot quarantine area, which is inside a heated barn.

Starting the rebuild of the 300 square foot quarantine area, which is inside a heated barn.

Since they were expected to spend a couple of weeks with us, a box with a concrete floor wouldn’t cut it. We had to attach a water bowl to the fence, set up a way to get them food, put in “habitat furniture” like igloo dens, hay bales, trees, and bedding, and work out a transfer mechanism to get them in and out safely.

As this was going on, we scoured the country for a rehab and release operation that could put the cubs back into the wild. Unfortunately, we’ve been unable to find anyone that could do it.

After the trees, dens, and bedding have been brought in.

After the trees, dens, and bedding have been brought in.

There was obviously paperwork to do as well. Various government organizations had to be notified, we had to get clearance from the state of Montana, and the cubs had to be vet-checked and chipped before crossing state lines. Once that was done, we brought them in.

They arrived rather unhappy (here, the male cub is letting us know what he thinks of being moved), but healthy. Wyoming Game & Fish had been feeding them well, and they’d already put on some weight.

They arrived rather unhappy (here, the male cub is letting us know what he thinks of being moved), but healthy. Wyoming Game & Fish had been feeding them well, and they’d already put on some weight.

When we transferred them to our quarantine area, the sisters went immediately for the sheltered area that we built for them.

When we transferred them to our quarantine area, the sisters went immediately for the sheltered area that we built for them.

Throughout this process, costs have been building up, and that’s just the beginning. We’re looking at extra staff time, vet bills, transfer crates, rental of a van to take them to their permanent home in California, and more. If we want to be prepared for this kind of rescue in the future, we need to substantially improve our holding pens and construct at least one more permanent outdoor cat habitat.

How can you help us? We’re glad you asked! Any cash donation will be gratefully accepted, and you can do that right here on our website. We also need a van for safer and warmer transport than our pickup trucks can provide. If you can help, we — and these beautiful cats — will thank you for it!

We are a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit and all donations are tax-deductible.

Donate to the Cat Rescue now!