Progress on the Wolf Habitat

Once the snow and rain stopped and the ground dried, we were able to get started on the expanded wolf habitat. As with most construction projects, there were set backs that delayed progress. However, we are happy to report we are nearing completion of this habitat. When you visit us, you will see there is still work to be done, but we are very close to having the habitat finished.

When you visit the Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary, you’ll see the fencing is installed and the ground where the lockout gates will be located has been leveled. The posts are set for the gates and the guillotine-style transfer gate is being built. This leaves the top wire to be threaded through the top posts to prevent any climbing out. Once these final 3 steps are done (gates installed, guillotine placed, and top wire threaded), we will clean up the construction debris and place the enrichment features.

Colder weather is knocking at the door and we are working feverishly to get these final steps done. We are as excited as our supporters and visitors to have the habitat ready for wolves.

So when do we actually get our new wolves? That depends. It can take a while to find a pack that requires sanctuary, and to do all of the required transfer paperwork, both Federal and state. It may happen in a month, and it may happen next spring. But once the habitat is complete, the process can begin!

  Fencing costs are higher than home chain-link because we have to use heavier (9-gauge) fencing to meet AZA standards, as well as making it 8 feet high and adding top wires.

Fencing costs are higher than home chain-link because we have to use heavier (9-gauge) fencing to meet AZA standards, as well as making it 8 feet high and adding top wires.

  Do those new fenceposts look rusty? That’s because a part of our conservation program centers around recycling and re-use. These posts are actually repurposed pipe stem from an oil rig. They are stronger than regular fenceposts, we get them cut to any length, and they don’t end up in a scrap yard somewhere. Everybody wins!

Do those new fenceposts look rusty? That’s because a part of our conservation program centers around recycling and re-use. These posts are actually repurposed pipe stem from an oil rig. They are stronger than regular fenceposts, we get them cut to any length, and they don’t end up in a scrap yard somewhere. Everybody wins!

  Wolves are excellent diggers, so our staff is laying fencing underground and tying it to the perimeter fence to stop them from digging out.

Wolves are excellent diggers, so our staff is laying fencing underground and tying it to the perimeter fence to stop them from digging out.

  Habitat design doesn’t stop with periphery fences. Landscaping improvements include terracing, addition of about a dozen new trees and bushes, and planting a variety of native grasses.

Habitat design doesn’t stop with periphery fences. Landscaping improvements include terracing, addition of about a dozen new trees and bushes, and planting a variety of native grasses.